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Issue:ISSN 1000-7083
          CN 51-1193/Q
Director:Sichuan Association for Science and Technology
Sponsored by:Sichuan Society of Zoologists; Chengdu Giant Panda Breeding Research Foundation; Sichuan Association of Wildlife Conservation; Sichuan University
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Your Position :Home->Past Journals Catalog->2014 Vol.33 No.4

Courtship and Mating Behaviors in Gazella subgutturosa
Author of the article:LIAN Zhongmin1,2, XIA Canjun1, YANG Weikang1*, DAVID Blank1
Author's Workplace:(1. Key Laboratory of Biogeography and Bioresource in Arid Land, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, China; 2. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China)
Key Words:Gazella subgutturosa; breeding behavior; driving females; copulation pattern; territory
Abstract:Courtship and mating behaviors of goitered gazelle Gazella subgutturosa were observed in Kalamaili Nature Reserve from 2009 to 2010. Finally, a total of 17 behaviors were recorded. The rut consists of two stages: preparatory and basic. During the first stage, males would stay in their territory all day. During the second stage of the rut, the male keep remaining in his range both day and night. Goirered gazelles frequently used feces to mark their territory, while the horn’s mark would keep longer duration. Trot behavior was frequently recorded, followed by walk and gallop, and the duration of walk was the longest gait when driving females. The combination use of different gaits was the optimal strategy to ensure the success of driving females and energy save. The courtship and mating processes of goitered gazelle can be divided into three steps. The first step is approaching followed by the second step, courtship performance, when the females are ready, and the male will walk upright and slowly walk towards the female. Then the third step is mating. The mating pattern of goitered gazelle belongs to the No. 13 of Dewsbury’s system and No. 14 of Dixson’s system for classifying copulatory patterns, respectively. Goitered gazelle improves the level of care by defending the whole territory rather than specially care by the female after copulation.
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