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Issue:ISSN 1000-7083
          CN 51-1193/Q
Director:Sichuan Association for Science and Technology
Sponsored by:Sichuan Society of Zoologists; Chengdu Giant Panda Breeding Research Foundation; Sichuan Association of Wildlife Conservation; Sichuan University
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Sex Dimorphism of Micropercops swinhonis During Reproduction and Non-reproduction Period
Author of the article:IN Jinjin, ZHANG Fangfang, QIU Yuping, CHEN Guozhu*
Author's Workplace:1 National Wetland Ecosystem Fixed Research Station of Danchi, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming 650224, Yunnan Province, China; 2 College of Wetland, National Plateau Wetland Research Center, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming 650224, Yunnan Province, China
Key Words:biological invasions; Micropercops swinhonis; sex dimorphism; reproduction period
Abstract:Currently, researchers are interesting in the sex dimorphism of alien species as it might play a significant role during the process of alien species invasion. A freshwater goby, Micropercops swinhonis, which are the typical invasive fish in Lake Dianchi, Kunming, China, suggested having sex dimorphism; however, no definite quantitative data to support this opinion. In order to determine whether the sex dimorphism is real in M. swinhonis and make a preliminary comprehension on the relationship between the fish invasive ability and its sex dimorphism, we conducted a morphological analysis of male and female M. swinhonis in this paper. Fish was collected from a basin named Huahongyuan, Kunming China, which is around the Lake Dianchi watershed. A generation replacement occurred between May and June 2017, thus two reproduction groups of M. swinhonis were detected, generation I and generation II. Generation I was collected from Spetember 2016 to May 2017. Generation II which occurred at the late of March 2017 is the offspring of generation I and was collected from June to July 2017. The results show that many measurements are significant difference between male and female M. swinhonis whatever in reproduction and non-reproduction peroid samples. Male M. swinhonis are much larger than the female fish in reproduction period; however, it is no significant difference in the non-reproduction fish instead. Determined by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA), principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant analysis, the sex dimorphism of M. swinhonis also was revealed. In generation I, one result shows that male and female fish morphology are separated along the axis of the second principal component (PC2) and the ratio of depth of caudal peduncle vs. body depth, GH vs. standard body length suggested to be the principal measurements which had a major contribution to the morphological difference between male and female fish. However, in generation II, male and female fish morphology are separated along the axis of the first principal component (PC1) and total length, standard length, etc. are the the principal measurements which had a major contribution to the morphological difference between male and female fish. Reproductive selection pressure and reproductive strategy adaptation is suggested being the driving force for the M. swinhonis to form the sex dimorphism in which male fish are much larger than the female might benefit to their offspring early survival rate. As a result, sex dimorphism in M. swinhonis has a considerable meaning to their population expansion during their invasion process.
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